New Crisco Certified Organic Coconut Oil Makes Waves in the Real Food Community

NEW Crisco Certified Organic Non-GMO Project Verified Coconut Oil Creates Waves in the Real Food Community | thesoftlanding.comA few days ago my husband and I were shopping at our local Hy-Vee grocery store when we stumbled upon Crisco Certified Organic Coconut Oil right there in the regular cooking aisle.  We immediately put the cart into reverse to go back and verify what we thought we had seen.  Was it real?  We stared at it in disbelief before deciding we had to capture this mutation in the wild!  I mean really…when has the Crisco logo EVER been seen next to the USDA Certified Organic seal?

A Visceral Response and Growing Distrust of Big Food

It's turned out to be an unexpected way to take the pulse of Americans at this particular time in history.   There's been such a visceral response that the photo has gone viral since we first uploaded it to Facebook (over 3 million people have seen it now).

Reactions have run the gamut from utter disbelief, to accusations of photoshopping, and even claims that Crisco must have paid the FDA under the table for use of the USDA Certified Organic seal – clearly evidence of a growing distrust of Big Food. In fact, Campbell Soup CEO Denise Morrison was quoted earlier this month in Fortune Magazine explaining the precarious position of legacy brands (like Kraft Foods, ConAgra and J.M. Smuckers, Crisco's parent company):

Like other companies in our industry, we’re contending with now not just the long-term impact of the Great Recession on consumer purchasing behavior, or the increasingly complex public dialog when it comes to food, or the regulatory environment for food. What’s more, the traditional avenue for selling Campbell’s products—grocery stores—are coming under a lot of pressure from alternative retailers.

Consumers are demanding change and Big Food is beginning to respond.

Confusion About Organic Certification

We also noticed while reading through thousands of comments that there's a whole lot of confusion about the organic certification process. Only Organic does a great job of explaining how the organic seal indicates that food has been grown in sync with the environment, while looking out for the health of humans and animals by avoiding the use of harmful substances, like toxic pesticides, synthetic fertilizers andgenetically engineered (GE) seeds.

It's a difficult certification to achieve, requiring a large investment of time and money from companies submitting their products for third party oversight.  And the truth is that organic certification is the only way we can verify that the claims being made on food labels are true, all the way from the farm to our table.

What's Your Take on Crisco's Shift to Organic?

Are you completely turned off by the idea that Crisco is testing the market for organic products?  If so, you might be surprised to know that Crisco's new organic coconut oil is also Non-GMO Project Verified (check it out for yourself right here).  But most people don't seem to be swayed even in light of this information, especially because the company has supported bans on GMO labeling.  About 80% of the folks we've talked to so far said they either don't trust it or they just aren't interested in buying it and will continue supporting companies that back GMO labeling and began providing certified organic products long before it was fashionable (brands like Nutiva, Dr. Bronner's and Tropical Traditions were mentioned over and over).

This made us curious about how some of the health food industry change leaders were reacting to this latest turn of events, so we contacted Robyn O'Brien and Leah Segedie to get their take on it.

The health of our families is changing. It is driving a fundamental shift in the way that we feed our loved ones. With the record rates of food allergies, diabetes and obesity, a growing number of consumers look for “free-from” foods, foods that are free from trans fats, artificial ingredients and GMOs, and more and more Americans are turning towards organic. It is where the industry is seeing tremendous growth. Crisco's move is a smart financial one as it is an attempt to play in this space and capture the upside. The landscape of food is changing. ~Robyn O'Brien

For organic to be sustainable, it must be profitable.  Seeing companies like Crisco test the waters in targeted areas with organic products tells us the demand for good food is increasing.  And as long as Americans want organic, they will get it.  Then they get to pick and choose which companies they want to support. ~Leah Segedie

I don't know about you, but we agree with their perspective and see this shift as progress.  Big Food is feeling the pressure and is responding to consumer demand. Isn't that what we wanted? Isn't this how we move forward to create a world where truly healthy food options are available to everyone?

So what do YOU think?  Share your thoughts in the comments!

P.S. We've been asked whether it's refined, and we don't have the information yet.  In the meantime, keep in mind that the term “refined” doesn't automatically mean that scary chemical processes or hydrogenation are involved.  Even Nutiva makes a refined certified organic coconut oil for people that don't want the coconut-y taste.

UPDATE: We just heard back from Crisco about how the coconut oil is refined and here’s what they said: “It is expeller pressed, and then refined using a mechanical process that does not include the addition of any solvents or other chemicals.”

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52 Responses to New Crisco Certified Organic Coconut Oil Makes Waves in the Real Food Community

  1. Pooters February 23, 2015 at 11:58 pm #

    I tweeted about this last week when I found about it. I just don’t trust it / them. I’m sure they mean well but I’ve worked for large food companies like this. They’re just jumping on a band wagon to capitalize on a trend and increase sales and unfortunately, smaller, more well intentioned companies, suffer as a result. It would be like if Huggies or Pampers decided to make a cloth diaper!

    I’m a small business owner and small companies can’t compete with the larger marketing spend and power the big companies have. So I take moves like this personally. So no thanks Crisco – I’ll stick with my Wildnerness Natural coconut oil that comes from a nice, family run business.

    • AlphaLady777 June 20, 2016 at 5:04 pm #

      Not all of us can afford the outrageous prices. Crisco is way lower in price……..

  2. copajoe February 24, 2015 at 6:33 am #

    the problem is that when people do not buy it, they will shelve the idea and go back to making only the shit that people are used to seeing from them. its unfortunate but true. for them to break the cycle they will have to stay on this path until people start to believe them. good luck I say, I hope they are for real….

    • Deanna Johnson May 10, 2015 at 1:34 am #

      I’m so late on this post but completely agree with you @copajoe. I bought it, & I actually really like it. I even use it as a body butter, & no problems here! #ThumbsUpCrisco

  3. Bet Sobon February 24, 2015 at 7:37 am #

    I think it’s great. I’m not sure I would buy it, because I have a great source for my coconut oil. But it’s a step in the right direction. As long as they don’t try to ‘improve’ it using chemicals. Until we can get GMO labeling on everything, having something labeled organic and non-GMO is a good thing.

  4. E'beth February 24, 2015 at 8:28 am #

    My concern is that these big companies, once they get their foot in the organic door, will slowly begin trying to dilute the Organic standards. It is all about profits. A business has to have a bottom line of profit, yes, but belief in certain standards, not just money, is needed too.

  5. Beth Terry February 24, 2015 at 9:42 am #

    I think it’s a great step for them. Definitely progress in the right direction. That said, I won’t buy it unless I’m traveling and it’s the only option available because I prefer to support the smaller companies. But if I lived in an area where those brands were not available, I probably would buy it.

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters February 24, 2015 at 1:16 pm #

      I totally agree. I’ll continue to support smaller organic companies too, but I’m happy to see Big Food companies listening to consumer demand. ~Alicia

  6. bilposey February 24, 2015 at 9:48 am #

    My wife and I have proven it time and time again, when a Big Food company offers something organic
    we
    sometimes have folded and try some of their product and always regret
    it. We’ll end up having issues, usually hives or rash, sometimes even
    asthma. You can’t trust big corporations, they miss the point we don’t
    want mass produced food, they’re all about the money. People that buy
    organic have a philosophy that you buy from small, local if possible,
    sustainable businesses that produce good clean safe food with peoples
    health in mind first, that we can trust. When has a big corporation ever put people ahead of profits.
    They will short cut the system where and when ever they can and use
    what ever they can to increase profits, even if it means bending the
    rules and regulations. Crisco no, they don’t have a chance, they won’t make it.

  7. Carissa Bonham February 24, 2015 at 12:54 pm #

    I’m glad that Crisco has seen the value in producing organic products and hopefully it will introduce more people to real food. I already have a brand of coconut oil I love (Nutiva) and will continue buying my coconut oil from them.

  8. Steve Ray February 24, 2015 at 7:36 pm #

    CRISCO has always made organically pure food stuffs since the days they were created in the 1930’s by Procter & Gamble as an alternative to cooking lard. My grandfather helped introduce CRISCO which stands for “Crude Resulting In the Separation of Cottonseed Oil”. Please learn your history.

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters February 25, 2015 at 4:38 pm #

      Hi Steve, I appreciate you taking the time to stop by! I’m not sure who you’re speaking to when you say “Please learn your history” though. Can you clarify please? ~Alicia

      • Steve Ray February 25, 2015 at 4:48 pm #

        It’s very simple…anyone who continues to use the blanket “Big Food” or “Chemical Filled” label on CRISCO products. The original CRISCO formula was about as pure as you could get with minimal preservatives & a recommendation that it be refrigerated. Even the current CRISCO historian and the Procter & Gamble historian were surprised to learn of the product history when sent the notes from my grandfather’s introductory material, cookbooks (for both CRISCO and Duncan Hines cake mixes which he also introduced pre–WWII), and personal notes from the hotel & restaurant test kitchens used to show it as a healthier alternative to lard…which is rendered animal fat. I fear there are too many posters who are so stuck on their “talking points” that they ignore the truth and the real history behind these companies and individual products.

        • stephanie March 22, 2015 at 3:53 pm #

          to Steve Ray: I agree that CRISCO (and quite a few other products) were
          originally made with natural and fairly unadulterated ingredients and
          have an innocuous
          history. You may not have taken a look at the
          ingredient list of a can of CRISCO lately, though. Currently, CRISCO is
          no longer made with cottonseed oil, but soy and palm oils, and even the
          orginal formula was created with hydrogenation, an un-natural process.
          Further, there is also the chemical preservative TBHQ and the
          emulsifying stabilizers ‘mono and diglycerides’ (but no mention if they
          are sourced from GMO oils or chemical-based version), so that they are
          shelf stable. There is also no indication of the soybean oil used not
          from GMO soy, so I’ll assume it is GMO soy. (Since GMO proponents are so
          very against including it in ingredient labeling) My point is that
          ‘Big Food’ has had a very big effect on the original CRISCO recipe, as
          well as many other products. And this has happened about 20 years or so
          after the war-eras you mentioned, mostly starting in the late 60’s and
          revving up into the 70’s, to present.
          My concern is that Big Ag/Big
          Food sees ‘Organic’ not as something to embrace, but as a competitor
          they need to dominate, and that makes me fear the positive future of
          ‘Certified Organic’ foods.

          • Cyberdeck June 6, 2015 at 5:11 pm #

            Lol, cottonseed oil is not good for you. It is taking a non-food item, cotton plants and finding a market for the waste products. Just because something is natural, does not mean it is meant to be eaten or is good for you. Palm oil on the other hand can be good for you if it is not hydrogenated.

            As much as I want to take a stand on GMO’s, I just finished a research paper on no-till, organic, integrated gardening and during my research on GMO’s found that the peer reviewed research on it is mostly positive. But to address the potential GMO soy, as I understand it, most soy is now GMO.

            And just to throw another fun item in, canola oil is one I would suggest people consider researching and then if you have it, use it to pour around the foundation of your house to act as a less toxic barrier for insects such as termites. Or you can eat it, but I wouldn’t. JMHO.

            I’m glad I started reading the comments. I forgot about cold expeller pressed as opposed to expeller pressed. Kudos to Crisco for not using chemical solvents. I’ve emailed Crisco to see if they use the cold expeller pressed or not. I don’t know if the high heat generated in regular expeller pressed does damage the oil and fractionate it or not, but since the market has sellers that use the cold expeller pressed method, I’ll take safety over risk, especially since coconut oil is not a cooking oil and from my research should never be used to cook. Peanut oil and a few others are naturally able to do that job.

            • stephaniegbeaumonde June 6, 2015 at 7:39 pm #

              —– Original Message —–
              From: Disqus
              To: stephaniegaledesign@yahoo.com
              Sent: Saturday, June 06, 2015 3:11 PM
              Subject: Re: Comment on New Crisco Certified Organic Coconut Oil Makes Waves in the Real Food Community

              “Lol, cottonseed oil is not good for you. It is taking a non-food item, cotton plants and finding a market for the waste products. Just because something is natural, does not mean it is meant to be eaten or is good for you. Palm oil on the other hand can be good for you if it is not hydrogenated. As much as I want to take a stand on GMO’s, I just finished a research paper on no-till, organic, integrated gardening and during my research on GMO’s found that the peer reviewed research on it is mostly positive. But to address the potential GMO soy, as I understand it, most soy is now GMO. And just to throw another fun item in, canola oil is one I would suggest people consider researching and then if you have it, use it to pour around the foundation of your house to act as a less toxic barrier for insects such as termites. Or you can eat it, but I wouldn’t. JMHO. I’m glad I started reading the comments. I forgot about cold expeller pressed as opposed to expeller pressed. Kudos to Crisco for not using chemical solvents. I’ve emailed Crisco to see if they use the cold expeller pressed or not. I don’t know if the high heat generated in regular expeller pressed does damage the oil and fractionate it or not, but since the market has sellers that use the cold expeller pressed method, I’ll take safety over risk, especially since coconut oil is not a cooking oil and from my research should never be used to cook. Peanut oil and a few others are naturally able to do that job.” Settings

              A new comment was posted on The Soft Landing Blog

              ——————————————————————

              Cyberdeck
              Lol, cottonseed oil is not good for you. It is taking a non-food item, cotton plants and finding a market for the waste products. Just because something is natural, does not mean it is meant to be eaten or is good for you. Palm oil on the other hand can be good for you if it is not hydrogenated.
              As much as I want to take a stand on GMO’s, I just finished a research paper on no-till, organic, integrated gardening and during my research on GMO’s found that the peer reviewed research on it is mostly positive. But to address the potential GMO soy, as I understand it, most soy is now GMO.
              And just to throw another fun item in, canola oil is one I would suggest people consider researching and then if you have it, use it to pour around the foundation of your house to act as a less toxic barrier for insects such as termites. Or you can eat it, but I wouldn’t. JMHO.
              I’m glad I started reading the comments. I forgot about cold expeller pressed as opposed to expeller pressed. Kudos to Crisco for not using chemical solvents. I’ve emailed Crisco to see if they use the cold expeller pressed or not. I don’t know if the high heat generated in regular expeller pressed does damage the oil and fractionate it or not, but since the market has sellers that use the cold expeller pressed method, I’ll take safety over risk, especially since coconut oil is not a cooking oil and from my research should never be used to cook. Peanut oil and a few others are naturally able to do that job.
              6:11 p.m., Saturday June 6 | Other comments by Cyberdeck

              Reply to Cyberdeck

              Cyberdeck’s comment is in reply to stephaniegbeaumonde:

              to Steve Ray: I agree that CRISCO (and quite a few other products) were originally made with natural and fairly unadulterated ingredients and have an …

              Read more

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          • Robert F Wainblat III April 11, 2017 at 8:21 am #

            Oh Stephanie, GMO foods have no negative health effects, update your talking points, because science doesn’t support your beliefs

        • AlphaLady777 June 20, 2016 at 5:01 pm #

          I have used Kirk’s original hard-water castle soap for 30+ years – now in unfragranced too! Made from coconut oil! I never develop a rash or hives. Great soap and I am chemically sensitive…………..

  9. Appropriate Omnivore February 25, 2015 at 4:30 pm #

    Why does the Crisco bottle in the photo have TheSoftLanding.com web address on it?

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters February 25, 2015 at 4:36 pm #

      That’s just our watermark. We took that photo at the grocery store and want to make sure it’s credited to us when people share it. ~Alicia

  10. Josephine March 7, 2015 at 4:11 am #

    There are many things that can happen to Coconut Oil (or any ‘healthy’ oil to render it MUCH less healthful than meets the eye. Crisco says it does not use any chemicals or solvents in it’s pressing or processing of Coconut oil and that it is expeller pressed. Expeller pressing is a process by which (electric – high powered) machines press the oil out instead of using a solvent to extract it. The problem is that this process still uses extreme HEAT and coconut oil is then broken down and many of it’s molecules then becoming longer chain saturated fats … the kind of fat that is implicated in heart disease, obesity and other chronic diseases. RAW Organic UNREFINED COLD Expeller Pressed Coconut oil is the oil that makes the difference and there are more than a few OLD companies that have been making it …. long before it became fashionable or Cost effective to do so. I find it VERY hard to trust a company who makes ‘food’ but does not care or have at it’s BASE interest at least SOME concern for public health. Crisco and a few others were the very companies that engaged in a very detrimental AD campaign along with the FDA in the early seventies, This ad campaign was created to convince ‘consumers’ that coconut oil was bad for their hearts. In place of this they were offered and MARKETED HEAVILY for vegetable oils and margarine. Soon the ‘homemade’ coconut oil businesses (especially in the Carribean and India) were going out of business or barely surviving. Heart disease became an epidemic (worldwide but especially in the U,S.) in direct proportion to these claims and the changes people (consumers) began to make in the direction of these oils. Fast Food also was becoming a lucrative business at that time and represented another abundant market The shelf life of these oils and their low cost was enough to get almost all restaurants, schools and even hospitals to use it … so pardon me if some years have passed and now I am supposed to TRUST Crisco. I am not completely cynical. If they are held to the same standards and enough people realize the difference in this Organic Crisco, maybe it will move them to change production, but I HIGHLY doubt it unless somehow consumers can hear the truth and purchase the HEALTHY Coconut OILS in droves first. Some people believe all labels and do not look further at what they do not know. I have been born and raised eating a ‘health food’ diet and honestly want people to understand the difference. It sounds like a simple conversation about a food or product but in the case of cooking oils, it is truly a matter of health … or death. Please check out this article … http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/04/how-vegetable-oils-replaced-animal-fats-in-the-american-diet/256155/

    • Gary April 22, 2015 at 11:41 am #

      The problem is that this
      process still uses extreme HEAT and coconut oil is then broken down and many of
      it’s molecules then becoming longer chain saturated fats … the kind of fat
      that is implicated in heart disease, obesity and other chronic diseases
      I am trying to research this whole statement to see if any of it has any truth….so far I have found no link between heat turning medium chain into long chain….
      And also the newest science is disputing the link from long chain to heart disease….

  11. Danskane April 4, 2015 at 8:58 pm #

    My wife purchased some of this coconut oil today because it appeared to be equivalent to another brand yet roughly half the price. She did hesitate first because of the Crisco name on the bottle and then because of the some what strange “dirty” color of the oil. But then, after reading the label which seemed to say that there was nothing “bad” about it and also asking an employee at Superfresh if It was “good” , she went for it. Still not really convinced, she pulled It out of the grocery bag when she came home to show me the new coconut oil And said “what do you think of this?” the color really didn’t look right to me Since I am used to the familiar white color. But brown rice is better than white rice. So I said, “what the heck” let’s try it. Not Sure How many readers here use coconut oil mainly for skin and hair care as well as for “pulling”. But those are our main uses for it. We rarely use it in our food. First thing we did was smell it. Amazingly, It has no smell. I mean, why would anyone want coconut oil that does not smell Like coconut?. Could It taste Like coconut oil If it does not smell Like coconut oil? We never got that far with It. But we did run some into our hands. And my wife put some on her face. It’s about 2 hours later now, and she has a rash on her face . And I am sitting here saying to myself, once again, you get what you pay for. And after reading the bit about the heat used in the processing, I realize that the fools that own Crisco took what may have been a perfectly good oil and ruined it. I was a product designer when I was still working and worked for a large corporation that owned a very well known brand. The owners of that company sold their souls just like most people that spend their lives focusing solely on making money. These guys are no different. And there were few people in the product creation area that really cared about anything other than their paycheck. And those that really cared and worked hard to create great products had to fight for every inch of quality and integrity they wanted to put into their work….with little or no reward and even ridicule sometimes. Our system is sick, people! It doesn’t HAVE to be this way. But, sadly, it is. And it’s a cryin shame.

    • Dan August 18, 2015 at 9:47 am #

      This is a refined coconut oil NOT an unrefined coconut oil…big difference! It needs to be cold pressed to be an unrefined product.

      • The Soft Landing Sisters
        The Soft Landing Sisters August 19, 2015 at 3:25 pm #

        As I mentioned above, refined isn’t always as horrible as it may sound. There are
        specific guidelines these companies have to follow when refining their
        certified organic coconut oil, and I personally prefer not to have a
        coconut-y taste since I take it every day. My personal favorite is
        Nutiva’s refined organic coconut oil. You can read more about how it’s
        processed here: http://kitchen.nutiva.com/intr… ~Alicia

  12. Dan April 14, 2015 at 12:53 pm #

    Did you notice it does not have a coconut flavor or smell? I don’t know if it is real, but if you buy coconut oil is for cooking and flavor should be there. Organic? how it can be organic if they removed the smell, what process they used for this? I’m returning it.

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters April 14, 2015 at 5:28 pm #

      Several organic coconut brands don’t have a smell because they’re refined (like Spectrum). The important thing is to make sure that they’re refined without solvents. We asked Crisco about this (and it’s in the P.S. of our post above): “We just heard back from Crisco about whether the coconut oil is refined and here’s what they said: It is expeller pressed, and then refined using a mechanical process that does not include the addition of any solvents or other chemicals.” We sometimes prefer coconut oil without the coconut-y smell and taste depending on what we’re using it for. But that’s our two cents. ~Alicia

      • Joyce July 16, 2015 at 12:05 pm #

        You want unrefined for vitamins, etc

  13. Tricia Haley June 12, 2015 at 4:51 am #

    NGANU DILI MAN KA MAG LIVE!

  14. joyce July 16, 2015 at 12:03 pm #

    I don’t trust it. All these years they talked about how bad coconut oil was, now all of a sudden they want to jump on the good for you band wagon? It may say organic but is it unrefined? i don’t trust them. My mom saw it and bought it. I had to educate her on the difference. Just because it says organic doesnt mean it’s unrefined.

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters August 19, 2015 at 3:25 pm #

      Refined isn’t always as horrible as it may sound, Joyce. There are
      specific guidelines these companies have to follow when refining their
      certified organic coconut oil, and I personally prefer not to have a
      coconut-y taste since I take it every day. My personal favorite is
      Nutiva’s refined organic coconut oil. You can read more about how it’s
      processed here: http://kitchen.nutiva.com/intr… ~Alicia

  15. mendells-selection July 24, 2015 at 7:45 am #

    I think it would be foolish to think that this is a genuine and good product.

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters August 19, 2015 at 3:24 pm #

      That USDA Certified Organic seal says otherwise. You wouldn’t believe the process these companies go through to obtain that seal. It’s tremendously time consuming and costly. ~Alicia

  16. Dan August 18, 2015 at 9:49 am #

    This is a refined product, heat processed and NOT an unrefined product that is cold pressedt!

    • The Soft Landing Sisters
      The Soft Landing Sisters August 19, 2015 at 3:23 pm #

      That’s not always so horrible as it may sound, Dan. There are specific guidelines these companies have to follow when refining their certified organic coconut oil, and I personally prefer not to have a coconut-y taste since I take it every day. My personal favorite is Nutiva’s refined organic coconut oil. You can read more about how it’s processed here: http://kitchen.nutiva.com/introducing-nutiva-refined-coconut-oil/ ~Alicia

  17. BuzzPreston November 7, 2015 at 8:50 am #

    I’m late coming in to this. Just saw this junk in our local grocery store ad. My first reaction was negative. How can anyone trust a brand who’s main produce, which they continue to produce and sell, is known to damage the health of the people who use it. I also suspect that they are using the organic seal and the non GMO label as marketing tools to induce unsuspecting customers to buy it on that information alone. The fact that it is refined trumps those two aspects and puts it into the junk category, which is normal for a company that contributes heavily to the anti-GMO labeling campaign.

    • Doc January 17, 2016 at 4:22 pm #

      refined means it can be used with high heat and not produce carcinogens. be sure what you think is what you mean.

      • BuzzPreston January 17, 2016 at 4:47 pm #

        If it’s from Crisco, it more than likely produces carcinogens, or worse, without high heat. But I’ll research it further anyway.

  18. Lilyann51 December 24, 2015 at 10:42 am #

    Horrible stuff..especially for those of us who’ve used both refined and unrefined pure coconut oil. Crisco is using false labeling because this tastes like shortening and melts to a cloudy color. Coconut oil will melt and become clear..never cloudy.

    • Doc January 17, 2016 at 4:19 pm #

      Entirely not true, in my experience. No shortening taste at all, melts crystal clear and with a very high smoke point. Are you sure you weren’t using another brand?

      • Lilyann51 January 18, 2016 at 6:28 am #

        I used some last week and it did seem to melt quite easily and with no greasy taste, but tasted like shortening, which I grew up eating. My opinion is I believe the coconut oil is most likely highly refined and made from dried copra. This explains why it’s so inexpensive. But it doesn’t melt crystal clear, nor does it have any health benefits. I paid over $6 for mine, if I wanted something not as healthy as coconut oil, I’d have bought a cheap shortening.

        • Laura Meacham Winkler January 22, 2016 at 10:52 am #

          I agree. I know what Crisco tastes like and i know what coconut oil tastes like. This stuff might be coconut oil, but it tastes more like Crisco and lacks the distinctive sweet coconut smell I’m so used to. Im thinking it’s been refined to death.

          • Lilyann51 January 22, 2016 at 2:35 pm #

            I’m thinking you’re absolutely correct. I buy Gold Label Tropical Traditions Virgin Coconut oil when I see it on sale such as now with one gallon 1/2 off. Melts clean, tastes dreamy, and I know it’s healthy and how it’s made.

  19. john smith June 2, 2016 at 8:33 am #

    Maybe if the Crisco brand wasn’t responsible for MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS of deaths in the last 50 or so years, thanks to their trans-fats (that at some point they knew were bad) I might think about using it.

    People are suspicious of “big food” companies for VERY good reasons. They’ve tried to hide the fact that trans-fats are bad for you for the last fifty some years. They lobbied congress to insure that they don’t have to label their crap GMO foods, and even made it illegal for individual states to require it. They put sugar and corn syrup (HFCS) into every-f%&king-thing (see 2nd ingredient in Campbell’s tomato soup). They use loop-holes in the law to try to fool the consumer all the time. Like making the serving size so small, that they are able to hide the amount of carbohydrates in it by making it look like it has zero carbs (under 0.5 grams per serving they can list it as zero).

    We can’t trust big food, big Agra, or our congress. So the smart people have been educating themselves for the most part, and voting with their checkbooks. I try to illuminate other consumers in my local grocery if they’re willing to be educated. But sadly, most people still believe that it is illegal to sell poison labeled as food, and that their bought and paid for (by the lobbyists) government will look out for them…

    I started a ketogenic diet 7.5 months back (minus 80LBS ;-), and that’s when my eyes were opened to the LARGE amounts of sugar that gets put into EVERY processed food. Since then, I’ve had to shift my diet from processed foods to mostly unprocessed foods (cooking most things from scratch) due to the added sugars and starches in pretty much ALL processed foods. But I have also learned to be much more vigilant on the type and quality of fats that I now consume, since that is my primary fuel now. It’s amazing how many foods still have artificial fats (hydrogenated) in them, and you almost have to have a chemistry degree to decipher the ingredients in some “foods”.

    Sorry, I won’t be buying anything labeled “healthy” from anybody whose main product for the last 100 years was basically poisonous.

  20. AlphaLady777 June 20, 2016 at 4:52 pm #

    I did buy the Crisco organic coconut oil – very hesitatingly, I might add. In order to eat it without feeling bad, I actually took a Sharpie marker and blotted out the Crisco name-brand. I did not die from eating it — as I imagined! But I still wonder if it might be that yucky Crisco sludge in disguise? I bought another tub recently. It really is not bad ……………..

    • stewartparks October 29, 2016 at 12:50 pm #

      I laughed out loud at hearing what you had to say about marking the name Crisco out. I feel the same way. I buy it for my pets as well as myself, and the price is delicious, but I am still concerned about the quality. I am tempted to buy it every time, but something holds me back. Crazy isn’t it?

  21. AlphaLady777 June 20, 2016 at 4:54 pm #

    Absolutely no flavor. You are right! Kinda spooky…..

  22. DaemonJax . September 17, 2016 at 6:43 am #

    Of course it has no coconut flavor. It’s REFINED.

    There are many refined and unrefined brands. If you want unrefined for the coconut flavor, then you have to buy unrefined. It’s that simple.

    There’s nothing particularly wrong with refined coconut oil — because you may not want a coconut flavor in a particular recipe. But it matters HOW it’s refined.

    If the label doesn’t say “naturally refined” or “mechanically refined” or “Expeller-pressed”, then we need to assume it’s refined with chemicals.

    This product is probably refined with chemicals, which is why I personally wouldn’t buy it. Just like the Lu-ann brand (or however it’s spelled).

    It’s still probably a healthier choice than seed oils, though.

  23. Jaime Lynn January 7, 2017 at 5:24 am #

    I bought Crisco’s coconut oil, I like it, but I am concerned that they did not share more about their process with you. Do they begin with fresh coconut or Copra? This difference makes a big difference as I am using coconut oil for specific health benefits.

  24. TerriLynn Deal March 4, 2017 at 8:00 pm #

    Funny. I bought the Crisco coconut oil and have it sitting on my kitchen counter for about two weeks now. I just can’t get myself to even try it. Can’t get over the color.
    After reading all the comments here, I’ll be returning it tomorrow and buying my usual brand instead

  25. Jeff May 16, 2017 at 6:35 pm #

    Crisco makes refined and has unrefined coconut oil-the refined is more yellow and cheaper in cost it states the whiter product as organic and unrefined and comes from the Philippines. I assume that means it is cold pressed and not heated. The smell is coconut-the taste is coconut -64% saturated fat-0 trans fat-Unrefined -usda Organic-non GMO verified-

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