Is the Beaba Babycook Really Worth the Money?

Okay, now let’s be honest – I wasn’t born to cook like my sisters, but I do want to be able to make healthy baby food for my son. I just need it to be easy – really easy.

I first began my search for a BPA-free baby food processor several months ago, and just kept running into the Beaba Babycook at every turn. There was some debate as to whether it was made with polycarbonate plastic or not, so I decided to contact the manufacturer directly to find out. I learned that all components coming in contact with food are made of polypropylene (PP) and polysulfone (PSU) – all BPA and PVC-free materials.

Now I was left with only one hurdle – the $150 price tag. I wasn’t sure I could get past it, so I took some time to see what others had to say. I check Amazon.com to see what kind of rating it received an average of 4.5 out of 5 stars. Not bad . . .

Then after searching my favorite websites, I came away with an amazing number of positive reviews from many Mommy bloggers:

Fawn & Forest

The Beaba Babycook is one of those baby gadgets that I thought was slightly ridiculous because why should making baby food require a separate appliance? Some things seem so ridiculous that I have to try them out for myself. Perfect timing: our baby son Owen is starting solids.

This is what i found upon making sweet potatoes for the baby: i absolutely love the Beaba Babycook! It’s amazing, right? Even though I am not a first time mom + have made baby food before I found it incredibly…. effortless.

Read full review here.

Mommies with Style

Lets get one thing straight. I am a capitol “L” Lazy chef. Anything over five minutes in the microwave and two pots to wash and I am thinking maybe I should order out. Or save it for a special occasion. Like a party. Which I would probably want to have catered come to think of it… I’m more of a cupcake decorator than a dinner maker. I frost. I sprinkle. But I don’t like to toil in the kitchen.

Using the Beaba Babycook I am able to create 4-5 servings of a healthful meal for my baby in less time than it takes to go to the grocery store and purchase a jar of the pre-made stuff. At a fraction of the price. Who knew that making my own baby food would be the ideal solution for a lazy gourmet like me?

Read the full review here.

Mamanista

The Babycook is idiot-proof since the steamer automatically turns off when the food is done. You can control the consistency of the food and make either a smooth puree or something with more texture. Clean-up is super fast since there are no pots or dishes to wash. Just put the Babycook in the dishwasher’s top rack.

While [$150] might sound expensive, think about how much money you currently spend on baby food. I mostly serve Gerber food, so I was spending about $10 a week on baby food. (If you serve a premium organic babyfood, you might be spending up to $20 a week.)

Read the full review here.

Celebrity Baby Blog

For Son Number One I opened about a million jars of babyfood, but after watching my sister and my best friend do all of theirs from scratch, I decided to give it a whirl with Son Number Two. He’s eight months old and we haven’t opened a jar yet, and I’m finding it’s a lot easier than I expected. At first I thought the Beaba Babycook ($150) was overkill. I mean, who needs another piece of equipment when a pan for steaming and a mini food processor for pureeing did the trick? Well, I do. I’ve been using the Babycook daily.

It’s an all-in-one steamer and processor and it’s really simple. Just peel and dice whatever fruits and veggies you want to serve and add the recommended amount of water (1,2 or 3 – the bowl serves as a measuring cup). Flip the switch to “steam” and off you go. The water level works as a timer. When the water is gone, the heater shuts off. That’s perfect if you’re multitasking and can’t stand by the stove while the food steams. You can cook just about anything in under 15 minutes.

Read the full review here.

So is it worth the investment?

I’ve decided that in the long run I’ll be saving time, money and frustration while giving my baby wholesome, organic baby food. And of course, I’ll be freezing some ahead of time in my BPA-free Baby Cubes and Fresh Baby Trays :)

>> FIND some great tips on making your own baby food at Organic Baby Products 101

Photo Source: Fawn & Forest

* This article was originally posted at Seriously Spoiled by Laura, Sister #3 :)

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  • Miranda

    I thought about buying the Babycook but — even though it's BPA-free — I'm still a little concerned about steaming and warming baby food in plastic. I ultimately decided to use a stainless steel steamer pot and a stainless steel food mill — yes, it's a little more work but, given everything that we've learned about plastics of late, I think it's probably safer.

  • willowsprite

    For me, to buy something specifically to make baby food is a waste of money. Especially since it's made of plastic, relying once again on petroleum products. Plastic never really goes away and I don't think I would ever cook in it. I use my bamboo steamers and glass/stainless steel blender, which are also used for many other things, not just baby food.

  • Anita

    You may want to look into what polysulfone is.

  • Anita

    You may want to look into what polysulfone is.

  • http://www.chirky.com/ jes

    Hi: I'm thinking about buying a Beaba. My concerns aren't necessarily related to the “green” issues. Rather, I'm wondering: How many months did you use the Beaba? I'm under the impression I would only use it for about four to six months, and I just can't decide whether the $150 pricetag is worth it!! I'd rather just cook on the stove/puree in my blender/food processor. Thoughts?

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