What if You Can’t Afford to Buy a PVC-free Christmas Tree This Year?

What If You Can't Afford a PVC-Free Christmas Tree This Year?First, let me say that we recommend going with a real Christmas tree if possible (read more about why here). But what if allergies make having a live tree in your home impossible and you can’t afford to invest in a PVC-free Christmas tree this year? It’s a totally legitimate question, and one that we’ve been getting non-stop this season.

How to Use a PVC Christmas Tree More Safely

It’s no doubt that polyethylene (PE) Christmas trees are definitely more expensive, and we’re only talking about a couple of weeks out of the year here, right? I believe it’s possible to strike a balance when it comes to living a safe, natural life, so let’s work through this tricky situation together.

As you know, toxic PVC plastic is no joke, so keep in mind that there’s no perfect solution to having a big pile of it sitting in your living room…

Let’s start with the good news: if you have an older tree, it off-gasses those volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for a few days up to about four weeks.

This means that your main concern will be the chemicals in PVC (i.e. lead, phthalates, and possibly flame retardants) that continue to slough off and end up in the dust around the tree.

Here’s what I recommend:

How will you be handling your artificial Christmas tree this year?

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  • Tracy B

    The PE tree you have linked still contains PVC according to the product Q&A. Where do you get truly 100% PE trees?

    • Thank you for pointing that out, Tracy! We actually meant for that link to go to our Christmas tree guide, so we’ve updated it now. You happened to have commented during the time we were updating our guide with the bad news we received about the National Tree Company confirming that their trees are now being made with PE + PVC. Grrrr! It’s such a disappointment to see things moving backward…

Designed by Alicia Voorhies

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